5 ways to avoid over eating this Christmas

avoid overeating at Christmas

Christmas is just around the corner, and with it the fear of an expanding waistline, the deliciously tempting fare on offer, and the abundance of extra celebrations like the office Christmas party, how can you avoid overeating this Christmas?

  1. Don’t Forget Breakfast

It’s the oldest dieting tip in the book, but it also applies when it comes to not overeating too. On Christmas Day particularly, don’t forgo breakfast because of the feasting coming later. This is likely to backfire and see you reaching for the calorie-laden nibbles with as much gusto as a child unwrapping their Christmas stocking.

Instead, make sure you start a potential feast day with a healthy and filling breakfast. Smoked salmon and scrambled eggs, or grilled mushrooms on toast are still indulgent ways which ensure that your eating and celebrations get off on the right foot.

 

  1. Consider When to Stop

It might be stating the obvious but it’s something to easily overlook in practice, especially when faced with another full canape tray as it swings around the venue once more. Before a situation where you are likely to over eat consider what would be a sensible amount.

A good way to do this is to consider a one plate rule. Have what you like, but make sure it’s all on one plate at the same time. If you saw all the food you were eating piled on to one plate, would you really still want it all? It’s a sure fire way for the calories to creep up on you.

Don’t forget, when entertaining at home, the freezer is your friend. Food needn’t go to waste, freeze it and then use it for a range of delicious recipes after the gluttony of Christmas has faded.

 

  1. Swap Out and Love Veg

The problem with Christmas Day feasting is usually about getting the balance right. We love the ‘works’ with our turkey or other festive fare, but that’s where the sneakiest calories lurk. Instead, make sure you have plenty of tasty non-starchy veg that can swap in leaving the naughtier items as the treats they are. This is actually easier than you may realise. Cranberry sauce generally has less fat than gravy, Brussel sprouts with chestnuts are a festive alternative to calorific turkey skin.

At Christmas parties and get-togethers choose the healthier options. Instead of getting lost in the cheeseboard, have a taste of that deliciously exotic fruit cocktail.

Furthermore, swap out some of the focus on food to focus on other things: doing things together, decorations, and even gifts.

 

  1. Don’t Deprive Yourself

Come on, it’s Christmas! The reality is that if you aim to plough through the celebrations on carrot sticks and celery, you’re going to be miserable. The result is that you are far more likely to end up bingeing on the after dinner chocolates without any stopping point until you feel positively ill. So earlier in the day, make sensible choices but include treats in there too.

The same applies to parties. Allow yourself some, and therefore keep a healthier balance in check.

 

  1. Slow Down

Christmas feasting isn’t a race. The food is delicious and fancy, so slow down and savour every morsel. In so doing, you’ll enjoy what you eat more, as well as eating less. Give yourself time to enjoy each item from your chosen selection and you’ll feel less inclined to go for seconds before you’ve even realised just how full you are.

And don’t forget, it’s a short part of the year. Avoid crash dieting afterwards, and simply return to healthy eating, and you can be sure that any pounds that snuck themselves in more stealthily than Santa will be banished soon enough.

Please note: All information within Your Resource Centre is correct at the time of publication, and we make every effort to keep content accurate. However sometimes information may be out of date. You should not rely on this information when making financial decisions as no financial advice has been given. The information reflects the view of the author and not that of Shepherds Friendly Society.

If you’re not sure what to do when making financial decisions then you should consult a financial adviser, who will likely charge for any advice that is given.

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